New Amendment at DC City Council

6/7/18

A new amendment at DC City Council has been proposed affecting the garnishment of wages. On Wednesday, July 11, 2018 CM Elissa Silverman is holding a round-tablebefore the Committee on Labor and Workforce’s implementation of the Universal Paid Leave Amendment Act of 2016.  The committee will review quarterly reports due by June 30 in addition to the status of other elements implementation.

 

Please let Doug know if you wish to testify before July 9, 2018. You may also submit written statement to Ms. Royster at labor@dccouncil.us.

 

On another subject, Council members Grosso, Nadeau, Bonds, Silverman, Evans, and White are sponsoring this amendment to prevent wage garnishment from individuals making less than the DC living wage, to limit the amount that (more…)

Testimony from DC Employment Services – Labor & Workforce Development

 

 

Full Video

 

“Testimony related to the District of Columbia Department of Employment Services (DOES) at the DC Council Committee on Labor & Workforce Development’s Budget Oversight Hearing on April 18th

 

Please note- testimony from Fred Codding and Vic Cornellier can be witnessed at time 2 hour 07 mins – 2 hour 27 mins.  

Employment Services Department

The DC Department of Employment Services has issued proposed regulations for the Universal Paid Leave Program. A copy of those proposed rules is attached. Should you wish to provide comments on the proposed regulations please do so prior to the deadline. Since the rules were published in the D.C. Register in early April, they will remain open for public comment in not less than thirty (30) days after publication of the notice. Deadline is Monday, May 7th.

The bill which passed on April 7, 2017, covers anyone working in the District even though the company is domiciled in Maryland or Virginia. The Act provides covered employees with 8 weeks of paid parental leave, 6 weeks of paid family leave, and 2 weeks of paid personal medical leave.  The paid leave will be funded by a 0.62% increase in DC employer payroll taxes.

Employers need to be aware that this bill covers District residents as well as those from Maryland and Virginia if they are working in the District. However, it does not cover a District resident who is working in another jurisdiction. Under the Act, “eligible individuals” may request paid leave following the occurrence of certain qualifying events, subject to a one-week waiting period during which time no benefits are payable. “Eligible individuals” include: (1) individuals who have been “covered employees” during some or all of the 52-week period preceding the occurrence of a qualifying event; or (2) self-employed individuals who have opted into the paid leave program, and who spent more than 50 percent of their work time in D.C. during some or all of the 52-week period preceding the occurrence of a qualifying event.

“Covered employees” include employees of “covered employers” who: (1) spend more than 50 percent of their work time in D.C. working for that employer; or (2) who regularly spend a substantial amount of time working for that employer in D.C., and who do not spend more than 50 percent of their work time for that employer in another jurisdiction.

“Covered employers” include: (1) any individual, partnership, general contractor, subcontractor, association, corporation, business trust, or group of persons who employs or exercises control over employees and is required to pay D.C. unemployment insurance on the employees’ behalf; or (2) self-employed individuals who opt into the paid-leave program. The D.C. and Federal governments are excluded from the definition of “covered employer.”

Under the Act, “eligible individuals” may request paid leave following the occurrence of certain qualifying events, subject to a one-week waiting period during which time no benefits are payable. “Eligible individuals” include: (1) individuals who have been “covered employees” during some or all of the 52-week period preceding the occurrence of a qualifying event; or (2) self-employed individuals who have opted into the paid leave program, and who spent more than 50 percent of their work time in D.C. during some or all of the 52-week period preceding the occurrence of a qualifying event.

“Covered employees” include employees of “covered employers” who: (1) spend more than 50 percent of their work time in D.C. working for that employer; or (2) who regularly spend a substantial amount of time working for that employer in D.C., and who do not spend more than 50 percent of their work time for that employer in another jurisdiction.

“Covered employers” include: (1) any individual, partnership, general contractor, subcontractor, association, corporation, business trust, or group of persons who employs or exercises control over employees and is required to pay D.C. unemployment insurance on the employees’ behalf; or (2) self-employed individuals who opt into the paid-leave program. The D.C. and Federal governments are excluded from the definition of “covered employer.”

 

Employment Services Department of 7 DCMR Ch. 34 Paid Leave

Staying Up To Date With Construction Requirements Under The Law

D.C. Politics

Audit: D.C. fails to enforce law requiring contractors to hire out-of-work residents

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The renovation of Duke Ellington School of the Arts was among the projects reviewed by the D.C. Auditor’s office as part of an audit of the city’s local hiring requirement. (Photo by Michael Robinson Chavez/The Washington Post)

 

By Fenit Nirappil April 19 at 3:00 AM Email the author

 

The District government failed to make sure that companies with city contracts hired unemployed residents as required by law and rarely penalized those who didn’t, according to an audit released Thursday.

Between 2013 and 2016, the city failed to enforce local hiring requirements, even after lawmakers tightened the rules and added penalties in 2011, according to a report by D.C. Auditor Kathleen Patterson.

The 30-year-old “First Source” program is based on a simple principle: Private companies that receive public dollars should help city residents find work.

(more…)

D.C. Mayor Seeks to Stop Costly Legal Delays to Development Projects

D.C. Politics

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An intersection in Washington’s Union Market neighborhood is shown Feb. 9. Advocacy groups have filed eight appeals against various development projects in the gentrifying neighborhood. (Justin T. Gellerson for The Washington Post)

 

By Paul Schwartzman February 28 at 5:56 PM Email the author

 

Activists seeking to thwart the breakneck speed of development across the District have turned with greater frequency to the city’s highest court, filing legal challenges that have delayed more than two dozen projects in the past two years and driven up their costs.

(more…)

“Business proposals to overhaul D.C. paid family leave law are dead — for now” Article by Fenit Nirappil, The Washington Post

Business proposals to overhaul D.C. paid family leave law are dead — for now

By Fenit Nirappil February 9 Email the author

 

D.C. Council Chairman Phil Mendelson (D) this week announced he was dropping efforts to overhaul the city’s paid family leave law in a more business-friendly fashion, ending some of the uncertainty over a new government program that is among the most generous in the country. (more…)